Science is Backing “Beauty Sleep”

Beauty sleep is officially a concept in the science world! Researchers in Sweden conducted a survey where volunteers were photographed after 8 hours of sleep, then again after being awake for 31 hours.

The results:

“Sleep deprived people are perceived as less attractive.”

To back this up, get a mental image of yourself at its hottest. Did you look sleepy? Of course you didn’t! Sleep is obviously necessary for function, and it’s also necessary for aesthetic purposes.

Now ask yourself: do you get enough sleep at night? If your dark circles, red eyes, and yawning mouth answer “no,” then maybe it’s about time you try a ChiliPad. Sleeping at your ideal temperature will help you get a deep, restorative sleep that will have you waking up the next morning feeling good with a mega-watt smile like your favorite Disney character.

…Or this Bull Dog.

[Info from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-11993944]

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In conjunction with the last blog…

In conjunction with the last blog, where I took catnaps on cold floors when I didn’t feel the best, this blog is about what happens when I get chills.

Who takes hot showers when they feel cold? This girl does. And I know a few of you do too. It doesn’t matter if it’s the third shower of your day, the purpose isn’t to get clean, it’s to get warm.

And the feeling is delicious.

Even if you’re not the type who showers for warmth, who has experienced this: That cold winter morning when you just rolled out of bed and tripped your sleepy, cold self into the shower. And once you feel that steamy water trickle down your back, you’re content to just stand there all morning.

The ChiliPad is the exact same thing! Except that wonderful warm water isn’t showering down upon you, it’s flowing right under you through silicone tubes.

It doesn’t matter if you keep it cool or like it hot, the ChiliPad hits the spot 😉

Happy Day-After-4th-of-July!

Let’s take a quick survey. How many of you… 

  • Saw some fireworks last night?

(This girl.)

  • Got less than 6 hours of sleep?

(Me!)

  • “YOLOed” despite having to work the next day?

(Check.)

  • Are experiencing a monster hangover?

Alright, so I’m not hungover, but I did go to a 4th of July thing last night out on the lake to watch fireworks. Then I played pool with some friends and lost, a lot. Long story short, I got to sleep around 2AM and woke up at about 7.

(Fireworks over Lake Norman)

Except I didn’t actually get out of bed till 7:30. Since I figured I would be blogging about the snooze button, I counted how many times I hit it this morning: 8.

I always purposely set my alarm clock earlier just so I can “gradually” wake up. The snooze button is my best friend when it comes to sleep, but according to menshealth.com, it’s not the best idea. The director of Sleep Disorders Center at NY Methodist Hospital says that those few precious minutes between snooze-slapping don’t benefit you.

It’s best to pretend to be a morning person by rolling out of bed the moment your alarm clock goes off, the first time. As much as I wish I could take my own advice… we’ll see how it goes.

Happy snoozing (sleep) and lack of snoozing (the button),

Melia

http://chilitechnology.com/

A Symphony for Sleepers

Depending on whether or not you live in a noisy area, opening the window at night can vastly improve your sleep. The fresh breeze gets air circulating through the room, which your body loves! Also, in some areas, the open window can cool off the room. Science has proven several times over that people sleep better in cooler areas. And if the temperature outside is a little too hot or cold for comfort, the ChiliPad can help make up the difference for a good night’s sleep.

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Background noise can also come wafting through that window. As I tip-tap-type away right now I can hear the soothing sounds of ocean waves and the gentle pitter-patter of rain.

During summer nights in North Carolina, I like to hear the cicadas scratch their rhythmic sounds and the crickets chirp according to the temperature. And if I’m lucky, I can hear frogs from a nearby pond croaking in their watery cradles.

In the fall, wind rushes through the dying leaves creating a shhhhhh sound reminiscent of a mother’s pleas for young ones to fall asleep.

In the winter, my dad would kill me if I opened the window while he’s paying for the heater to run. No background noises for me 😦

But the spring I love the most because of all the rain. I sleep like a cat when the window is open and the big raindrops are pelting the rooftop and the forest behind my house.

Sweet Dreams and Enjoy the Symphony,

Melia

Sunshine and Sleeping

I would like to formally introduce you to 3 things right now.

1) Here is the alluring beach/pool setting I began my morning with.

 

2) Here is the unforgiving sun, pre-sunset, when I left the beach.

and 3) Here is the unfortunate, yet admittedly amusing, sunburn I managed to sustain from the combination of the above pictures and a lack of sunscreen. Apparently the aesthetically pleasing function of the ring on my swimsuit doesn’t communicate very well on a different medium, my hip.

Fast forward 6 hours and I’m blogging in bed, careful not to jostle my newly acquired red tint. It’s only 9:36, yet I find my eyelids heavy and slowly descending. It’s like gravity decided to quadruple its efforts on my eyelashes. The only thing I did today was lay out! How can I be sleepy so early? Browsing the mother of all knowledge, the Internet, I stumble across a fascinating article from Discovery Fit&Health that links sunlight and sleep.

 

Our body has this natural cycle called a Circadian Rhythm. It’s what tells our brain when to wake up and when to sleep. One of the things that regulates this cycle is sunlight. Geniuses are always conducting studies, and one of these geniuses discovered that getting exposure to the sun during morning hours can help you sleep better at night. This is because sunlight tells your brain to wake up, wake up, wake up! This natural alarm clock is a solid reference point that your brain can grasp on to to help it determine when nighttime/sleepytime happens later in the day.

 

Facts and Figures:

  • The body clock is most sensitive to sunlight between 6 and 8:30 AM.
  • Direct sunlight exposure for at least 30 minutes is best

 

So where do my angry looking tan lines and hot-tub-hating skin fit into this? It’s a mighty fine example of science at work. It’s now 10:07 and I feel like the walking dead. I normally stay up till at least midnight. I think overdosing on sun has proven to be just as effective as a spoonful of Nyquil and a decent back massage.

On that note, I’m off to break Rip Van Winkle’s record.

 

Sleep right & sleep tight,

Melia

 

Aloha!

Welcome to my new blog! It’s entirely about sleeping. Chances are you’re here because you can’t sleep, you love sleep, you’re a ChiliPad fan, or you just love to read. It doesn’t really matter how you got here, but you’ll leave here with the ability to sleep like this feline:

So subscribe to the blog, like our page (because we’re 5 likes away from 500!), curl into bed, and await further instructions. We’ll have you sleeping like a baby in no time!

Sleep Right & Sleep Tight,

Melia Sigmon

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